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Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.
  • The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another journal for consideration (or an explanation has been provided in Comments to the Editor).
  • The submission file is in OpenOffice, Microsoft Word, or RTF document file format.
  • Where available, URLs for the references have been provided.
  • Times New Roman should be used throughout the text: 14pt for the title (and possible subtitle), 12pt for the text and all section and/or subsection titles; 10pt for footnotes. Line-spacing should be 1,5 (including footnotes).
  • The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Author Guidelines.

Author Guidelines

SUBMITTING YOUR ARTICLE

The proposed length of an article is approximately 30.000 characters with spaces. The maximum limit for the article’s length is 45.000 characters with spaces.

The author should also provide an abstract of the submitted article, which should not exceed 200 words. Also, 5–7 keywords should be provided.

Alongside the article and abstract please send also a short paragraph about the author, his/her academic interest and expertise, and afiliation, if applicable (not more than 150 words).

The manuscript should be sent as a MS Word .doc or .docx file format.

Articles will be subjected to a peer-review process and assessed by the journal’s editorial board. Authors will be notified about the decision about publishing within a month after the submission deadline. At the same time selected authors will be advised for a revision, if recommended by reviewers. The corrected article shall be returned to the editors in 10 days.

After the journal being published one copy of the journal will be sent to authors to the address provided.

TEXT FORMAT

In order to facilitate a unified editing and formating of the submitted articles, please, adhere to the following instructions of formatting:

  • Times New Roman should be used throughout the text: 14pt for the title (and possible subtitle), 12pt for the text and all section and/or subsection titles; 10pt for footnotes.
  • Line-spacing should be 1,5 (including footnotes).
  • Page numbers should be included at the bottom of the page, central positioning.
  • Use first line indents, do not use tabs.
  • Please, do not use any kind of additional text formatting.

 Unified usage of characters and emphasis:

  • Quotation marks should be double (“”), use single quotation marks (‘’)only for quotes within quotes.
  • Use “en” spaced dashes ( – ) for parenthetical comments.
  • Use the “en” dash without spaces for a range of pages or other numbered values (1985–1991; 233–238; 12.2–12.6).
  • Use a colon (:) for separating a title from the subtitle for your article, its sections and subsections.
  • Use italics for emphasis (not bold nor underlining).
  • In text, use italics for foreign words.
  • In text, use italics for book titles and double quotation marks for article titles.
  • For omissions of text from quotation, please use ellipsis in parenthesis (...).

Abbreviations

For abbreviation usage consult the list provided below:

ABBREVIATION

Latin

English

chap., chaps.

 

chapter(s)

cf.

confer

confront

e.g.

exempli gratia

for example

ed.

editio, edere

edition

ed., eds.

editus, edere

editor, editors

et al.

et alii/aliae

and others

etc.

et cetera

 

ff.

folio

following pages

fig.

figura

figure

i.e.

id est

that is

ibid.

ibidem

Same (as above/before)

n.d.

 

No date

n.p.

 

No place

no.

numero

number

trans.

translatio

 

vol., vols

volumen

volume, volumes

 

Abbrevitaions in footnotes: In order to avoid confusion, we strongly recommend not to use the abbreviation op. cit., but rather the shortened variation of referencing (see examples provided in referencing section).

However, it is recommended to use the abbreviation Ibid., when a reference in the note is the same as in the previous note (see example below).

  1. Nussbaum, Not for Profit, 93.
  2. Ibid.
  3. Ibid., 99.

 

FIGURES

If the article includes pictures, graphs, artwork, keep in mind, that it will be printed only in grayscale version. Send this material separately as a JPEG file(s), not less than 300 dpi resolution. In the text, be sure to insert callouts (i.e. [INSERT FIG. 1 HERE]), so the figures will be placed accordingly.

COPYRIGHT

The author can only apply for publication with a text that has not previously been published and does not contain any copyrighted material, for which the copyright is not owned by the author (images, tables etc.). For additional information on including graphics etc. please contact the editors.

REFERENCING

Use the Chicago Manual of Style (CMoS), 16th edition, the “Notes and Bibliography” system of referencing: the references should be put in footnotes and a complete list of units of bibliography, ordered alphabetically, should be included under the section “Bibliography” at the end of the article.

Examples of footnote referencing and bibliographical entires

The following examples illustrate citations using the notes and bibliography system. Examples of notes are followed by shortened versions of citations to the same source, which are used after the first mention. Following an example of the same source as it appears in the “Bibliography” section is listed.

Books

One author

  1. Martha C. Nussbaum, Not for Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010), 81–85.
  2. Nussbaum, Not for Profit, 93.

Nussbaum, Martha C. Not for Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010.

Two or three authors

  1. Gregory Bateson and Margaret Mead, Balinese Character: A Photographic Analysis (New York: New York Academy of Science, 1942), 157–158.
  2. Bateson and Mead, Balinese Character, 161–162.

Bateson, Gregory, and Margaret Mead. Balinese Character: A Photographic Analysis (New York: New York Academy of Science, 1942), 157–158.

Four or more authors

List all of the authors in the bibliography; in the note, list only the first author, followed by et al. (“and others”).

  1. Kwame Anthony Appiah et al., Justice, Governance, Cosmopolitanism, and the Politics of Difference: Reconfigurations in a Transnational World (Berlin: Humboldt-Universitat zu Berlin, 2007), 5–13.
  2. Appiah et al., Justice, Governance, Cosmopolitanism, 7.

Appiah, Kwame Anthony, Seyla Benhabib, Iris Marion Young, and Nancy Fraser. Justice, Governance, Cosmopolitanism, and the Politics of Difference: Reconfigurations in a Transnational World. Berlin: Humboldt-Universitat zu Berlin, 2007.

Editor, translator, or compiler instead of author

  1. Thomas Claviez, ed., The Conditions of Hospitality: Ethics, Politics, and Aesthetics on the Threshold of the Possible (New York: Fordham University Press, 2013), 25.
  2. Claviez, Conditions of Hospitality, 28.

Claviez, Thomas, ed. The Conditions of Hospitality: Ethics, Politics, and Aesthetics on the Threshold of the Possible. New York: Fordham University Press, 2013.

Editor, translator, or compiler in addition to author

  1. Luce Irigaray, Between East and West: From Singularity to Community, trans. Stephen Pluháček (New York: Columbia University Press, 2002), 68–69.
  2. Luce Irigaray, Between East and West, 73.

Irigaray, Luce. Between East and West: From Singularity to Community. Translated by Stephen Pluháček. New York: Columbia University Press, 2002.

Chapter or other part of a book

  1. John D. Caputo, “Hospitality and the Trouble with God,” in Phenomenologies of the Stranger: Between Hostility and Hospitality, ed. Richard Kearney and Kascha Semonovitch (New York: Fordham University Press, 2011), 85.
  2. Caputo, “Hospitality,” 89.

Caputo, John D. “Hospitality and the Trouble with God.” In Phenomenologies of the Stranger: Between Hostility and Hospitality, edited by Richard Kearney and Kascha Semonovitch, 83–97. New York: Fordham University Press, 2011.

Journal articles

Article in a print journal

In a note, list the specific page numbers consulted, if any. In the bibliography, list the page range for the whole article.

  1. Jacques Derrida, “Given Time: The Time of the King,” Critical Inquiry 18 (Winter 1992): 167–168.
  2. Derrida, “Given Time: The Time of the King,” 169.

Derrida, Jacques. “Given Time: The Time of the King.” Critical Inquiry 18 (Winter 1992): 161–187.

Article in an online journal

  1. Seyla Benhabib, “Claiming Rights across Borders: International Human Rights and Democratic Sovereignty,” The American Political Science Review 103, no. 4 (2009): 696, https://doi.org/10.1017/S0003055409990244.
  2. Benhabib, “Claiming Rights across Borders,” 671.

Benhabib, Seyla. “Claiming Rights across Borders: International Human Rights and Democratic Sovereignty.” The American Political Science Review 103, no. 4 (2009): 691–704. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0003055409990244.

Where available, DOI numbers should be provided in the form of a resolvable URL (e.g. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0003055409990244).

For more examples consult the “Chicago-Style Citation Quick Guide”.

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